Date:
01 May 2012
The second conflict trends report from ACLED focuses on regional conflict trends within Africa. The analysis in this report concentrates on recent political violence emanating from the Sahel belt and East Africa, due to the rise in instability there. Focus countries include Algeria, DR-Congo, Mali, Nigeria, Somalia, Sudan, and South Sudan.
Date:
01 April 2012
This conflict trends report from ACLED focuses on regional conflict trends within Africa. The analysis is focused on recent political violence emanating from the Sahel belt and East Africa, due to the rise in instability there.
Date:
31 January 2012
Clionadh Raleigh and Dominic Kniveton use rainfall variability to explore the influence of the climate on conflict. Their article in the Journal of Peace Research shows that in locations that experience communal conflict events, the frequency of events increases in periods of extreme rainfall variation, irrespective of the sign of the rainfall change.
Date:
19 October 2011
CCAPS researcher Clionadh Raleigh's article in Global Environmental Change discusses how conflict patterns affect the volume, direction, and types of migration within the developing world.
Date:
06 December 2010

CCAPS researcher Clionadh Raleigh discusses the relationship between physical geography and conflict patterns within African states. The author finds that "an area's physical attributes do not have a uniform effect on the likelihood of experiencing a conflict event."

Date:
01 September 2010
This article in the Journal of Peace Research presents ACLED, an Armed Conflict Location and Events Dataset. ACLED codes the actions of rebels, governments, and militias within unstable states, specifying the exact location and date of battle events, transfers of military control, headquarter establishment, civilian violence, and rioting.
Date:
09 March 2010
This article in the International Studies Review by Clionadh Raleigh discusses the probability of increased communal conflict in African states due to the political vulnerability of groups to climate change.