Date:
13 February 2015

This paper by CCAPS researchers expands on the data, methodology, and results presented at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the International Studies Association in San Francisco (April 2013) and recently published in their paper “Climate security vulnerability in Africa mapping 3.0”, in Political Geography (Issue 43: 2014).

Date:
25 November 2014

In this article, published in Politcal Geography, CCAPS researchers Josh Busby, Todd G. Smith and Nisha Krishnan detail the methodological refinements made to an existing model of climate security, vulnerability, rationale for the approach, and the findings.

Date:
25 August 2014

This dataset provides data on literacy rates, primary and secondary school attendance rates, access to improved water and sanitation, household access to electricity, and household ownership of radio and television.

Date:
18 June 2014
CCAPS researchers Joshua Busby, Kerry Cook, Edward Vizy, Todd Smith and Mesfin Bekalo recently published an article examining areas in Africa where the confluence of vulnerabilities could put large numbers of people at risk of death from climate-related hazards. 
Date:
26 April 2013

Climate Change and Pastoralism: Traditional Coping Mechanisms and Conflict in the Horn of Africa, published by the Institute for Peace and Security Studies and the University for Peace, includes a chapter by CCAPS researchers on applying a continent-wide model of climate security vulnerability to East Africa and identifying the hot spots of concern.

Date:
26 April 2013
The Spring 2013 issue of International Security features an article by CCAPS researchers on mapping climate security vulnerability in Africa. The authors find that the places in Africa most vulnerable to the security consequences of climate change are parts of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Somalia, and South Sudan.
Date:
23 April 2013
The CCAPS Climate Security Vulnerability Model (CSVM) aims to identify places most likely vulnerable to climate security concerns in Africa. This document outlines the general mapping process used for the vulnerability model, the rationale for inclusion of particular indicators in the model, and the specific process for calculating vulnerability.
Date:
22 April 2013
In Research Brief No. 13, CCAPS researchers present the Climate Security Vulnerability Model which identifies the locations of chronic vulnerability to climate security concerns in Africa. This version of the model incorporates updated data sources, scales the data in a new way to capture differences in local vulnerabilities, and experiments with alternative formulas to determine how these various risk factors coalesce to impact local vulnerability.
Date:
26 February 2013

Does climate change constitute a national security threat to the United States? What is climate security vulnerability? In Course Module No. 1, CCAPS researcher Joshua Busby provides background material, discussion questions, scenarios, and resources for an in-depth discussion on national security and climate change.

Date:
20 December 2012
The Air and Space Power Journal Africa and Francophonie, a quarterly publication of the U.S. Air Force, featured an article by CCAPS researchers on the future consequences of climate change. The authors put forth the CCAPS model of vulnerability as an approach to identify where, when, and how climate-related events will disrupt Africa's security.
Date:
31 October 2012
Ignatius Madu's article in the International Journal of Climate Change explores the spatial patterns of vulnerability to climate change in Nigeria, finding that the more vulnerable households are in northern states that are characterized by a high degree of rurality. Dr. Madu is a winner of the CCAPS Call for Papers on environmental security.
Date:
01 May 2012

In CCAPS Research Brief No. 4, Jared Berenter provides findings from field research testing sub-national vulnerability maps. Field interviews supported many of the intuitions of CCAPS maps but also identified sources of divergence related to weighting population density, drought definitions, and challenges in capturing cross-border vulnerability.

Date:
01 March 2012

Researchers summarize findings of field research to ground truth the validity of CCAPS sub-national vulnerability assessments. With definitions of vulnerability and adaptation influencing how donors and recipients prioritize resources, the adaptation agenda presents new questions about how to systematically identify climate change vulnerability.

Date:
01 March 2012
In CCAPS Student Working Paper No. 4, Emily Joiner, Derell Kennedo, and Jesse Sampson expand on the CCAPS vulnerability model by incorporating new data on the political economy of governments as it may relate to their willingness and ability to adapt to climate change. Case studies include Nigeria and Guinea-Bissau.
Date:
01 October 2011

The CCAPS program held a workshop on May 16-17, 2011 to explore issues related to mapping and modeling climate vulnerability. Bringing together a range of experts, the workshop sought to forge tighter ties among the community of experts in this area, identify best practices, think through research challenges, and inform public debate.

Date:
01 August 2011
In CCAPS Student Working Paper No. 1, Sachin Shah, Sarah Williams, and Shu Yang examine countries' vulnerability and their ability to minimize the effects of climate change. Case studies include Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
Date:
01 August 2011
In CCAPS Student Working Paper No. 3, graduate students Sanjeet Deka, Christian Glakas, and Marc Olivier refine the CCAPS vulnerability model to account for region-specific characteristics relevant to North Africa, including migration, water resources, and terrorism. Sudan appears to be the most vulnerable country in the region.
Date:
01 August 2011
In CCAPS Student Working Paper No. 2, Bonnie Doty, Erika Grajeda, Pace Phillips, and Atul Shrestha outline the potential impact of climate change on security in East/Central Africa. Western Ethiopia, southern Sudan, eastern Burundi, and the tri-border region between Uganda, Sudan, and the DRC are identified as vulnerable to climate change.
Date:
01 June 2011
In CCAPS Policy Brief No. 3, Joshua Busby, Todd Smith, and Kaiba White identify which areas in Africa are most vulnerable to climate change, and why, at the most detailed scale possible. Africa is vulnerable to climate change, partly because of geography, and partly because of the low adaptive capacity of many African countries.
Date:
17 November 2010
In this German Marshall Fund report, Joshua Busby, Kaiba White, and Todd Smith examine how climate change and physical sources of vulnerability to natural hazards might intersect with North Africa's various demographic, social, and political challenges.