Research Reports: CCAPS research reports provide detailed information on the purpose, design, findings, and application of results of all studies conducted under the CCAPS program.
Date:
26 October 2016

This report summarizes CCAPS program findings in its nine core research areas: climate security vulnerability, future climate projections over Africa, climate change and conflict, armed conflict tracking, constitutional design and conflict management, democracy aid in difficult contexts, disaster response capacity, climate change resilience in urban Africa, and adaptation aid.

Date:
25 October 2016

CCAPS Democratic Governance researchers Ashley Moran, Brooke Escobar, and Daniel Robles-Olson explore what types of democracy aid are most successful in impacting democratic development in Africa, focusing on two particularly challenging contexts: countries recovering from conflict and countries facing low human development.

Date:
12 May 2016

In a Brookings Institutions paper, researchers Kate Weaver, Krista Rasmussen, Justin Baker, and Joshua Powell discuss a new methodoloy used to improve the analytic power of data on food security. The aid tracking pilot provides key insights into whether and how donors are shifting away from emergency food relief toward allocating longer-term development resources to address the underlying conditions of food insecurity.

Date:
15 September 2015

The report is based on a year-long Policy Research Project course that was co-directed by Robert H. Wilson and Todd G. Smith during the 2012-2013 academic year. The project explores the role of local government in developing resilience due to its key role in addressing urban vulnerabilities.

Date:
10 July 2015

In ACLED Working Paper No. 7, Tunisia's turbulent democratic transition is analyzed through existing theories of Islamist violence, as well as a model of protest cycles. The validity of the protest cycle model is tested in the case of Tunisia by analyzing how the patterns of conflict evolve over time and why they increasingly involve violent Islamist groups.

Date:
10 July 2015

ACLED Working Paper No. 5 examines coding armed conflicts from a range of sources including newspapers, online journals, and reports by humanitarian organizations. The researchers investigate whether certain types of publications exhibit bias, if urban bias exists in conflict monitoring, and if a state's government affects the compostion of internal conflict reporting.

Date:
11 May 2015

ACLED Working Paper No. 6 addresses how conflict dynamics in Egypt and Libya have transformed in the post-Arab Spring period with particular focus on the changes in contentious political strategies in response to changing institutional structures.  

Date:
28 May 2014

In CCAPS Working Paper No. 4, Robert Wilson and Todd Smith examine the responses and adaptations to climate change within ten African cities. Using a comparative case study approach, field research was conducted on the governance systems in Ghana, Egypt, South Africa, Morocco, Senegal, Tanzania, Uganda, Angola, and Mozambique. 

Date:
27 May 2014

CCAPS researcher Cullen Hendrix recently co-authored a book with Marcus Noland entitled Confronting the Curse: The Economics and Geopolitics of Natural Resource Governance. Hendrix and Noland look at why some countries with abundant natural resources are often plagued by mismanagement, exploitation and authoritarianism.

Date:
22 May 2014

In CCAPS Student Working Paper No. 6, a team of researchers led by Jennifer Bussell explores the causes of variation in government policies to reduce the risk of, prepare for, and respond to natural disasters. The report focuses on the African continent and ten case studies within Africa.

Date:
04 April 2014

This ACLED regional report underscores the changing complexity of North Africa’s conflict profile by providing an analysis of the role and activity of the state in political violence, dynamics of civil unrest in the form of riots and protests, and an actor-based study of historic and contemporary Islamist militancy across the region.

Date:
05 March 2014

In 2011, Malawi became the first country in the world to capture the near-universe of official development aid activities at the subnational level in a publicly available, dynamic map. In this report, the researchers present their geocoded data and discuss the evolution of the mapping initiative and the potential benefits of aid mapping. 

Date:
17 September 2013
The Strauss Center, the U.S. Africa Command, the National Defense University's Africa Center for Strategic Studies, and the U.S. Army Senior Service Fellowship Program hosted a two-day conference examining shifting conflict patterns in Africa. The conference gathered to discuss how political and demographic shocks could trigger violent conflict.
Date:
11 June 2013
In CCAPS Working Paper No. 3, Emerta Aragie examines the impact of climate change on agricultural production and finds that rainfall significantly explains economic activity. If the current rate of decline in the average annual level of rainfall continues, Ethiopia will forgo, on average, more than six percent of each year's agricultural output.
Date:
28 March 2013
In CCAPS Student Working Paper No. 5, a graduate student research team set out to examine how to effectively track development aid to Africa, develop a methodology to track climate change adaptation aid, and explore case studies about the challenges that African countries face when deploying aid resources to adapt to climate change.
Date:
06 August 2012
The Strauss Center, the U.S. Africa Command, the U.S. Army Senior Service College Fellowship Program, and the College of Liberal Arts hosted a conference examining the evolving dynamics of security in Africa. Policymakers, practitioners, military personnel, and scholars shared research on the issues impacting African and global security.
Date:
21 May 2012
In CCAPS Working Paper No.2, Ignatius Madu assesses the spatial patterns of vulnerability to climate change in Nigeria. The analysis shows that the more vulnerable households are in the northern states which experience frequent drought and are characterized by a high degree of rurality and poor socioeconomic development.
Date:
01 March 2012
In CCAPS Student Working Paper No. 4, Emily Joiner, Derell Kennedo, and Jesse Sampson expand on the CCAPS vulnerability model by incorporating new data on the political economy of governments as it may relate to their willingness and ability to adapt to climate change. Case studies include Nigeria and Guinea-Bissau.
Date:
01 March 2012
Researchers summarize findings of field research to ground truth the validity of CCAPS sub-national vulnerability assessments. With definitions of vulnerability and adaptation influencing how donors and recipients prioritize resources, the adaptation agenda presents new questions about how to systematically identify climate change vulnerability.
Date:
01 October 2011

The CCAPS program held a workshop on May 16-17, 2011 to explore issues related to mapping and modeling climate vulnerability. Bringing together a range of experts, the workshop sought to forge tighter ties among the community of experts in this area, identify best practices, think through research challenges, and inform public debate.