social conflict analysis database
Date:
21 January 2016

In a recent article for the Journal of Conflict Resolution, CCAPS researchers Cullen Hendrix and Idean Salehyan use the program’s Social Conflict in Africa Database (SCAD) to address issues pertaining the regime repression in Africa.

Date:
20 April 2015

In their article in International Interactions, CCAPS researchers Cullen Henrix and Idean Salehyan discuss underrporting bias. The authors propose using the method of mark and recapture to find an estimate of the true number of events. 

Date:
27 February 2015

Cullen Hendrix, a lead researcher on the CCAPS program, and Stephan Haggard recently published an article on global food prices and urban unrest in the Journal of Peace Research. Their research, which focuses on Africa and Asia and uses data from 1961 to 2010, is also highlighted in NewSecurityBeat, a blog by the Wilson Center's Environmental Change and Security Program.

Date:
01 January 2015

CCAPS researcher Idean Salehyan discusses best practices in collecting conflict data, including source selection, coding, and data sharing. 

Date:
11 December 2014
In CCAPS Research Brief No. 23, Idean Salehyan and Brandon Stewart tackle the question of why dissidents target the government at some times, yet at other times target other actors in society. The brief uses data from the newly expanded Social Conflict Analysis Database, which tracks social conflicts from 1990-2013, and now covers all of Africa, Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean.
Date:
10 December 2014
In Research Brief No. 24, Cullen Hendrix assesses water security in the Sahel by focusing on Niger and addressing the prospects for local, national, and international institutions to mitigate water conflict. The brief concludes that robust institutions are a critical conflict-mitigating tool and that local-level adaptations may be more effective in addressing water stress than broad national policies.
Date:
01 November 2014

Colleen Devlin and Cullen Hendrix's article in Political Geography explores precipitation patterns and interstate conflict. They find that "long-run variability in precipitation and lower mean levels of precipitation in dyads are associated with the outbreak of militarized interstate disputes" and that "joint precipitation scarcity – defined as both countries experiencing below mean rainfall in the same year – has a conflict-dampening effect."

Date:
21 October 2014

In this articleCCAPS researcher Todd G. Smith explores the issue of whether rising domestic consumer food prices are a contributing cause of sociopolitical unrest, more broadly defined, in urban areas of Africa.

Date:
01 September 2014

CCAPS researchers Idean Salehyan and Cullen Hendrix examine the relationship between environmental scarcity and political violence. The authors conclude that "water abundance is positively correlated with political violence, and that this relationship is stronger in less developed, more agriculturally dependent societies."

Date:
22 August 2014

In Research Brief Number 22, CCAPS researchers Aleksandra Egorova and Cullen Hendrix discuss the possibility of natural disasters providing an opportunity to build peace via negotiated settlements.

Date:
27 May 2014

CCAPS researcher Cullen Hendrix recently co-authored a book with Marcus Noland entitled Confronting the Curse: The Economics and Geopolitics of Natural Resource Governance. Hendrix and Noland look at why some countries with abundant natural resources are often plagued by mismanagement, exploitation and authoritarianism. 

Date:
22 November 2013
In Research Brief Number 21, CCAPS researchers Colleen Devlin, Brittany Franck and Cullen Hendrix address the concern that changing precipitation patterns will be a cause of future interstate conflict. By looking at long-term trends and short-term triggers, Devlin, Franck and Hendrix push beyond the common theories about resource-based conflict.
Date:
21 October 2013

In Research Brief No. 19, Idean Salehyan and Cullen Hendrix examine how characteristics of a social conflict event and the nature of the regime interact to determine repressive outcomes. Using the Social Conflict in Africa Database (SCAD), they find that events that are more threatening to the central government are more likely to be met with force.

Date:
22 April 2013
In CCAPS Research Brief No. 11, Todd Smith seeks to unravel the complex and circular relationship between food prices and social unrest in Africa and to provide insight into potential causal mechanisms. His findings indicate that a sudden increase in consumer food prices contributes to an increase in the probability of unrest in that month.
Date:
07 February 2013

In CCAPS Research Brief No. 7, Cullen Hendrix argues that the very features of democracy that make it better suited to address the issues of the rural sector - where chronic food insecurity is most prevalent - also make democracies more likely to see unrest in times of high food prices.

Date:
07 February 2013
In CCAPS Research Brief No. 6, Idean Salehyan and Christopher Linebarger use the Social Conflict in Africa Database (SCAD) to assess the relationship between elections and unrest. The study found that elections increase conflict in two distinct contexts: during times of civil war, and in authoritarian systems.
Date:
15 August 2012

In this article featured in International Interactions, CCAPS researchers Idean Salehyan, Cullen S. Hendrix, Jesse Hamner, Christina Case, Christopher Linebarger, Emily Stull, and Jennifer Williams describe the Social Conflict in Africa Database (SCAD) which contains information on over 7,200 instances of unrest in 47 African countries from 1990-2010.

Date:
01 April 2012
In CCAPS Research Brief No. 3, Cullen Hendrix and Idean Salehyan analyze the relationship between drought and political violence. The authors find that environmental scarcity is not always a trigger of political violence. Political violence is more prevalent following years of "good" rainfall, and drought suppresses certain types of violence.
Date:
31 January 2012
In their article in the Journal of Peace Research, Cullen Hendrix and Idean Salehyan examine whether deviations from normal rainfall patterns affect the propensity for individuals and groups to engage in disruptive activities such as demonstrations, riots, strikes, communal conflict, and anti-government violence.
Date:
01 February 2011

In CCAPS Policy Brief No. 2, Cullen Hendrix and Idean Salehyan examine climate change, rainfall, and social conflict in Africa. The authors argue that understanding and responding to the threat of climate-driven instability in Africa requires a definition of conflict that recognizes episodic unrest, riots, and demonstrations as well as interstate or civil war.