20 November 2017

Joshua Busby, Strauss Center Distinguished Scholar and CEPSA lead researcher, recently presented “In Harms Way: Climate Security Vulnerability in Asia” at the COP23 climate change meeting in Bonn, Germany. 

Dr. Busby’s research for this project centers on identifying the areas in South and Southeast Asia that are most vulnerable to security impacts caused by climate change. The research combines a series of maps to visualize how layers of data from social and environmental research together illustrate security risks to Asian countries.

Dr. Busby is a pioneer in the field of Climate Security Vulnerability, which he defines as “The risk in a particular location that large numbers of people could die from either direct exposure to a natural hazard or the follow-on consequences of dislocation and instability that the hazard might generate.” Myanmar, Pakistan, and Bangladesh are especially vulnerable to the cumulative impacts of population density, temperature and weather extremes, governance instability, and low household and community resilience. The research combines a series of heat maps to visualize tiers of data from social and environmental research that together illustrate security risks to Asian countries.

Dr. Busby’s research contributed to a diverse dialogue on climate change policy in Bonn coinciding with the United Nations twenty-third conference of parties (COP23). COP23 is part of the negotiation process for the Paris Agreement to limit global warming.

 

FlagsIcon