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02 May 2019

In partnership with ACLED Data, The Strauss Center has begun a new project analyzing political violence events. Some of our UT Austin undergraduate student coders in the program have agreed to talk about their work for the project, in anticipation for the program's imminent report release.

Today, we're checking in with Kaidy Li!

Tell us about yourself and what led you to the program.

"I'm a sophomore International Relations and Government major here at UT. When I heard about this research position through Women in Foreign Affairs, I applied because I thought it would be a great opportunity to learn more about what drives conflict and how violence manifests in other countries."

What's your day-to-day like as a coder?

"With ACLED, I primarily work on coding sub-events for cases involving remote violence or violence against civilians throughout Africa, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia. In coding, my role is to pay particular attention to capturing events which involve violence targeting women and women’s participation in political action."

Any challenges or suprising insights you've run into?

"Sub-event coding can be rather challenging sometimes because various nuances of an event can put it in a gray area, which is difficult to code. I also helped conduct research on women’s political participation and representation in Southeast Asia by compiling data on women candidates running for election and local views on gender in these countries. While collecting this data, I found it surprising that the percentage of women elected as representatives was consistently high at around 30% in Nepal and the Philippines, in contrast to just 23% in the U.S."

What are your hopes for this program and your work on it?

"Ultimately, I hope that the final data and report will be able to help identify better practices to decrease violence targeting women and increase women’s political representation and activism globally."

 

Previous coder interviews:
Tatiana Guevara

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