10 May 2017

The Strauss Center is very pleased to announce the acceptance of nine graduate students to its 2017 – 2018 class of the Brumley Next Generation Graduate Fellows program. Now entering its third year, the program’s new class comprises an impressive group of graduate students drawn from schools and departments across campus.

Involving graduate students in the Strauss Center’s research programs is an important part of the Center’s service mission, and the Brumley Fellows program enables the Center to directly engage with UT graduate students across the 40 Acres. The goal of the program is to provide a transformative experience for UT graduate students from an array of disciplines, accelerating their path towards career success with an emphasis on building professional and scholarly skills and networks and gaining exposure to perspectives and methods from outside their home departments. Towards that end, each year we select one Fellow for each of our research programs in a highly-competitive process involving applicants from varying fields of study.

The graduate fellowship program consists of two core components. First, each Fellow will work with their faculty mentor to identify a policymaker or scholar of particular significance for their career plans, whom the Strauss Center will then bring to campus for a dinner with that Fellow, a private colloquium with the full group of Fellows, and a public address. Second, each Fellow participates in a mentor-guided research project, including the option of Strauss Center financial support for associated research expenses.

The Next Generation Fellows program is funded by the Strauss Center’s Brumley Chair in Global Affairs, made possible through a generous contribution from Jon and Rebecca Brumley.

Meet the 2017 – 2018 Brumley Next Generation Graduate Fellows:

Molly Adler is entering the second year of her dual degree program at the LBJ School of Public Affairs and the Department of Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies. Her research focuses on the intersection of social technologies and security, with a particular interest in terrorist recruitment methods via social media. In her Brumley Fellowship, Molly will work under the Center’s Security Institutions and Technology program with the guidance of LBJ School Professor Paul Miller. Upon graduation, Molly will seek a position in which she can apply her analytical skills and knowledge base into facilitating greater dialogue on an international scale.

Casey Boyles is entering the final year of her Master’s degree program in the Department of Middle Eastern Studies. Her research centers on authoritarian regimes, national security, and structural factors in intelligence, meshing well with the Center’s Intelligence Studies Project (ISP)—jointly founded by the Strauss and Clements Centers—under which she will be working with ISP Director Steve Slick. Upon completion of her Master’s, Casey aspires to a political analyst position focusing on the Arab world.

Aleksej Demjanski is entering the second year of his dual degree program at the LBJ School of Public Affairs and the Department of Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies. His research focuses on the democratization processes of fragile liberal democracies in the Western Balkans. In his Brumley Fellowship, Aleksej will work with Ashley Moran, Director of the Center’s State Fragility program. Aleksej plans to pursue a career in democracy promotion organizations after completing his graduate studies.

Rachel German is entering the sixth year of her doctoral studies in the Department of Government. Her research examines the implications of increasingly vague and overlapping policy jurisdictions for cybersecurity policymaking in Congress and the bureaucracy. As a Brumley Fellow, Rachel will work with Cybersecurity Senior Fellow Matt Tait under the Center’s Integrated Cybersecurity Studies program. Upon completion of her PhD, Rachel plans to pursue a career in examining policy change related to cybersecurity and individual privacy.

Jacob Hofstetter is entering the second year of his Master’s degree in Global Policy Studies at the LBJ School of Public Affairs. His research interests lie at the intersection of state fragility and migration in Central America. Jacob is paired with Professor Ricardo Ainslie of the Department of Educational Psychology, working under the Center’s Mexico Security Initiative. After finishing his graduate studies, Jacob wishes to continue researching and analyzing the connections between migration and security.

Harry Kim is entering the second year of his Master’s degree in Global Policy Studies at the LBJ School of Public Affairs. His studies center on China's and the United States’ modernization of their nuclear weapons capabilities. Harry will work under the Center’s Understanding China program, mentored by LBJ School Assistant Professor Joshua Eisenman. He plans to pursue a foreign relations policy advisor position in D.C. at the completion of his graduate studies.

Joshua Orme is entering the third year of his dual degree program at the LBJ School of Public Affairs and the Department of Asian Studies. His research centers on the cross-cultural dynamics and depth of security challenges present in South Asia. Given his interests, he will work under the Center’s Complex Emergencies in Asia program with the guidance of UT History and LBJ School Professor Jeremi Suri. At the completion of his graduate studies, Joshua plans to pursue a career in global diplomacy relating to India and Pakistan.

Allison Swatek is entering the second year of her Master’s degree in Public Affairs at the LBJ School of Public Affairs. Her research focuses on criminal justice reform in Mexico, serving her well to work under the Center’s Mexico Security Initiative with the guidance of MSI Senior Fellow Stephanie Leutert. Upon graduation, Allison plans to pursue a position at an international-facing federal government agency or a multinational organization such as the United Nations or the World Bank.

Maro Youssef is entering the fourth year of her doctoral studies in the Department of Sociology. Her research involves Tunisia, civil society, national security, democracy, and Islamist governments. Maro will work with the Intelligence Studies Project (ISP) under which she will be paired with ISP Senior Fellow Paul Pope. Upon completion of her PhD, Maro plans to pursue a career in politics or the intelligence community.

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