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Bobby Chesney holds the James Baker Chair and also serves as the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the University of Texas School of Law. In addition, he is the Director of the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law, a University-wide research unit bridging across disciplines to improve understanding of international security issues.

In 2009, Professor Chesney served in the Justice Department in connection with the Detention Policy Task Force created by Executive Order 13493. He also previously served the Intelligence Community as an associate member of the Intelligence Science Board and as a member of the Advanced Technology Board. In addition to his current positions at the University of Texas, he is  a member of the American Law Institute, and a senior editor for the Journal of National Security Law & Policy, and a former non-resident Senior Fellow of the Brookings Institution.

Professor Chesney is a co-founder and contributor to www.lawfareblog.com, the leading source for analysis, commentary, and news relating to law and national security. In addition to his blogging at Lawfare, those interested in national security law should consider following Professor Chesney on Twitter (@bobbychesney) as well as subscribing to the National Security Law Podcast (which he co-hosts with his colleague Steve Vladeck). Professor Chesney's scholarship focuses on U.S. national security policies and institutions, encompassing both domestic and international law issues. His articles may be downloaded from SSRN here.

Professor Chesney is a magna cum laude graduate of both Texas Christian University and Harvard Law School. After law school he clerked for the Honorable Lewis A. Kaplan of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York and the Honorable Robert D. Sack of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. He then practiced with the firm Davis Polk & Wardwell in New York (litigation), before beginning his academic career with Wake Forest University School of Law. There he received a teacher of the year award from the student body in one year, and from the school's dean in another. In 2008 he came to the University of Texas School of Law as a visiting professor, and then joined UT on a permanent basis in 2009. He became the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in 2011.

Professor Chesney teaches a variety of courses, including: Constitutional Law, National Security Law, Foundations of Cybersecurity: Law, Institutions, and Policy; Law of the Intelligence Community; History of U.S. Counterterrorism Law & Policy: 1970 to Present; Evidence, Civil Procedure, and an array of seminars.  He is from San Antonio. 

Director and Charles I. Francis Professor in Law Robert Strauss Center

Ms. Ashley McIlvain Moran directs the State Fragility Initiative at the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law, where she leads research on state fragility dynamics, the intersection of fragility and climate risks globally, democratic governance aid in Africa, and water and conflict in the Middle East. She also serves as a core researcher on the Center's Department of Defense-funded program on Complex Emergencies and Political Stability in Asia, where she oversees development of mapping and analytical tools to share program research with the policy community. She previously directed the Center’s long-standing DoD-funded program on Climate Change and African Political Stability (CCAPS) and served for three years as the Center’s associate director. She is currently a security fellow with the Truman National Security Project. She previously served as parliamentary advisor in the Republic of Georgia for the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs (NDI), ran democratic reform programs and trainings in Iraq and Azerbaijan for NDI, and designed rule of law programs in Kyrgyzstan for the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE).

Her research focuses on the intersection of constitutional order and conflict, the role of constitutional courts in securing stability in new democracies, security assistance, and democratic legal and institutional reform. She received an MALD in comparative law and development economics from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, and she is currently pursuing a PhD in comparative constitutional law at the University of Texas at Austin.

State Fragility Initiative Director Robert Strauss Center

Stephen B. Slick is Director of the Intelligence Studies Project, a joint partnership between the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law and the William P. Clements Center for History, Strategy & Statecraft. He retired in 2014 after 28 years as a member of CIA's clandestine service.

Between 2005 and 2009, Steve served as a special assistant to the president and the Senior Director for Intelligence Programs and Reform on the staff of the National Security Council. He was previously the Director for Intelligence Programs at the NSC. While serving at the White House, Steve participated in efforts to restructure and reform the intelligence community informed by recommendations of the commissions charged with investigating the 9/11 attacks and the flawed pre-war analysis of Iraq's unconventional weapons programs. These efforts included a series of executive orders on U.S. intelligence issued in August 2004, key provisions in the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004, the administration's responses to recommendations by the "WMD Commission", as well as significant amendments to Executive Order 12333 that were approved by President George W. Bush in 2008.

Steve completed five overseas tours as a CIA operations officer and manager, including service from 2009 to 2013 as the chief of station and director of national intelligence's representative in a Middle Eastern capital. His assignments at CIA Headquarters included service as an executive assistant to the deputy director of central intelligence and leading CIA's operations in the Balkans. Steve received CIA's Medal of Merit, Commendation Medal and other awards.

Prior to joining CIA, Steve was a litigation associate at the law firm of Rawle and Henderson in Philadelphia. Steve received a B.A. from the Pennsylvania State University, J.D. from the UCLA School of Law, and Master in Public Policy from Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. 

Intelligence Studies Project Director Robert Strauss Center

William Inboden is an Associate Professor at the LBJ School of Public Affairs and Distinguished Scholar at the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law. He also serves as Executive Director of the Clements Center for National Security at the University of Texas-Austin Inboden's other current roles include Non-Resident Fellow with the German Marshall Fund of the United States, Senior Advisor with Avascent International, and Associate Scholar with Georgetown University's Religious Freedom Project. Previously he served as Senior Director for Strategic Planning on the National Security Council at the White House, where he worked on a range of foreign policy issues including the National Security Strategy, strategic forecasting, democracy and governance, contingency planning, counter-radicalization, and multilateral institutions and initiatives. Inboden also worked at the Department of State as a Member of the Policy Planning Staff and a Special Advisor in the Office of International Religious Freedom, and has worked as a staff member in both the United States Senate and the House of Representatives.

Inboden has also served as Senior Vice President of the London-based Legatum Institute, and as a Civitas Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. He is a contributing editor to Foreign Policy magazine, and his commentary has appeared in numerous outlets including the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Washington Post, NPR, Sky News, and BBC. He has lectured widely in academic and policy settings, and received numerous research and professional development fellowships. He is the author of Religion and American Foreign Policy, 1945-1960: The Soul of Containment (Cambridge University Press) as well as numerous articles and book chapters. Inboden received his Ph.D. and M.A. degrees in history from Yale University, and his A.B. from Stanford University.

Associate Professor of Public Affairs LBJ School of Public Affairs

Kate Weaver is Associate Professor and MGPS Graduate Advisor at the LBJ School. She received her PhD in Political Science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2003. From 2001-2002, she was a Brookings Research Fellow in Foreign Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C., and from 2002-2008 an assistant professor of political science at the University of Kansas.

Dr. Weaver's research focuses on the culture, behavior and reform of international financial institutions, foremost the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, as well as issues of transparency and accountability in international development aid. Most recently, she has been working on developing and testing methodologies to track and dynamically geomap international development aid and climate adaptation resources using GIS technology and fieldwork in Africa. She also conducts research on a wide range of issues related to the shifting power, players and paradigms in global economic governance.



Dr. Weaver is currently co-director (with Dr. Mike Findley) of Innovations for Peace and Development at UT and co-principal investigator on the UT sub award for a multiyear, $25 million collaborative partnership grant (with AidData, ESRI, Development Gateway and Brigham Young University), funded by the United States Agency for International Development's Higher Education Solutions Network. She is also a core researcher in the Strauss Center's program on Climate Change and African Political Stability (CCAPS), a multiyear research project funded by the U.S. Department of Defense Minerva Initiative.

 Dr. Weaver is the author of the award-winning Hypocrisy Trap: The World Bank and the Poverty of Reform (Princeton University Press, 2008); co-editor (with Nicola Phillips) of International Political Economy: Debating the Past, Present and Future (Routledge Press, 2010) and co-editor (with Manuella Moschella) of Handbook of Global Economic Governance (Routledge Press, 2013). In addition to several book chapters, she has also published articles in Global Governance, Journal of International Relations and Development, Brown Journal of World Affairs, Review of International Political Economy, New Political Economy, Review of International Organizations and PS: Politics and Political Science. She serves on the editorial boards of International Studies Quarterly and Review of International Political Economy.

Associate Professor of Public Affairs LBJ School of Public Affairs

Jeremi Suri holds the Mack Brown Distinguished Chair for Leadership in Global Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin. He is a professor in the university's Department of History and the LBJ School of Public Affairs. Professor Suri is the author and editor of nine books on contemporary politics and foreign policy. His most recent book is "The Impossible Presidency: The Rise and Fall of America’s Highest Office." His other books include “Henry Kissinger and the American Century,” “Liberty's Surest Guardian: American Nation-Building from the Founders to Obama,” “Foreign Policy Breakthroughs: Cases in Successful Diplomacy” (with Robert Hutchings), and “The Power of the Past: History and Statecraft” (with Hal Brands). Professor Suri writes for major newspapers and magazines including The New York Times, The Dallas Morning News, the Houston Chronicle, The Boston Globe, Foreign Affairs and Wired.

Website: http://jeremisuri.net/

Twitter Feed: http://twitter.com/#!/jeremisuri

Mack Brown Distinguished Chair for Leadership in Global Affairs LBJ School of Public Affairs and UT Department of History

David E. Adelman teaches and writes in the areas of environmental law, intellectual property law, and climate change policy. Professor Adelman’s research focuses on the many interfaces between law and science, with a particular emphasis recently on empirical studies of environmental policy implementation. His articles have examined the empirical bases of environmental justice concerns about greenhouse-gas trading regimes, the tensions between legal and scientific evidentiary standards in regulatory decision making, and development of effective policies for promoting innovation relevant to addressing climate change.  He is currently working on a comparative project evaluating the insights that can be drawn from diplomacy on nuclear arms control for ongoing international climate change negotiations.  

Professor Adelman is trained as both a lawyer and a scientist.  Before receiving his J.D. from Stanford Law School, he completed a Ph.D., also at Stanford University, in physical chemistry.  This technical background gives him a unique perspective on environmental and technology issues, as well as legal issues generally; his scholarship draws extensively on his knowledge and expertise in law and science.  Prior to entering academia, Professor Adelman was an associate with the law firm Covington & Burling in Washington, D.C., where he litigated patent disputes and provided legal counsel on environmental regulatory matters, and a Senior Attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council also in Washington, D.C., where he was both a litigator and worked on a broad range of environmental policies. Professor Adelman was an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Arizona Rogers College of Law from 2001 to 2009.

Harry M. Reasoner Regents Chair in Law University of Texas at Austin, School of Law

Dr. Ricardo Ainslie's work focuses on communities in the United States and Mexico that have experienced significant conflict, violence, and transformation, exploring broader questions about how communities absorb crises and how individuals and cultural groups live within them. A hallmark of his projects is that he uses a variety of media, including documentary film, photographic exhibits, and books, to foster reflection within the communities he studies and beyond them.

Dr. Ainslie's work is highly interdisciplinary in character as reflected in his affiliations with the Lozano Long Institute for Latin American Studies, the Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies, and the American Studies programs at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is also the M.K. Hague Centennial Professor in Education in the department of Educational Psychology.

In this work he has gravitated toward the methodological approaches more typically associated with anthropology, American Studies, Liberal Arts, and creative non-fiction, developing a hybrid methodology that he terms ‘psychoanalytic ethnography’ because he conducts in-depth interviews that typically have a deeply psychological character.

He is a native of Mexico City, Mexico, and a US citizen. He earned his Bachelor’s degree (Psychology) at the University of California at Berkeley, and his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at the University of Michigan. He is also board certified in psychology and psychoanalysis.

Professor University of Texas at Austin, Department of Educational Psychology

Michael R. Anderson directs the International Relations and Global Studies (IRG) major at the University of Texas at Austin, where he also serves as a lecturer in the College of Liberal Arts and the faculty director of the UT in Paris study-abroad program. His research interests include trans-Pacific intellectual networks and unofficial diplomacy in the twentieth century. The recipient of fellowships from the Rockefeller Foundation and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, Dr. Anderson earned his Ph.D. in History from the University of Texas at Austin in 2009. His dissertation is entitled “Pacific Dreams: The Institute of Pacific Relations and the Struggle for the Mind of Asia, 1925-1960.” Dr. Anderson is under contract with M.E. Sharpe as a co-author of a textbook provisionally titled The Political and Economic Foundations of Global Studies.






Director, International Relations and Global Studies University of Texas at Austin, College of Liberal Arts

Professor Avraham was the Assistant and then Associate Professor of Law at Northwestern University for the academic years 2003-7. He taught a course in Torts and Insurance law and co-lead the Law and Economics Colloquium. Prior to that Prof Avraham served as Visiting Assistant Professor at Northwestern University for the academic year 2002-3 where he taught a course in Insurance Law and a seminar in Distributive Justice. Prof Avraham served as a Visiting Assistant Professor at Tel Aviv and Bar Ilan Universities where he instructed on Distributive Justice and Economic Analysis of Law. In 2001 Prof Avraham visited The University of Michigan Law School as a Lecturer. He co-taught (with Jim Krier)a seminar in Behavioral Econ and served as a lecturer(with Kyle Logue) in a Distributive Justice in the Law seminar.

Ronen Avraham's primary research interests in 2010 are in economic analysis of torts and healthcare law. Specifically in the study of how liability reform can influence healthcare reform. In addition he writes about contract theory and theories of justice.

Thomas Shelton Maxey Professor in Law UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN, SCHOOL OF LAW

Samy Ayoub specializes in Islamic Law, modern Middle Eastern law, and law and religion in contemporary Muslim societies. He focuses on issues concerning law, its interaction with religion, and the role of religion in contemporary legal and socio-political systems within a global comparative perspective. He has legal training in Egypt, United Kingdom, and in the United States. He has taught in law schools, and in religion and Middle Eastern Studies departments. Dr. Ayoub is currently serving as the president of the Islamic Law Section at the Association of American Law Schools (AALS).

Dr. Ayoub’s dissertation and current book project, Law, Empire, and the Sultan: Ottoman Imperial Authority in Late Ḥanafī Jurisprudence, won the 2015 Malcolm H. Kerr Dissertation Award. It is currently under review with Oxford University Press. Dr. Ayoub’s second book project is a legal study of political violence in the early modern Ottoman Empire. It investigates Muslim jurists' responses to armed rebellion against Ottoman political order, and traces how these premodern Muslim legal formulations on dissent, rebellion, and terrorism shape contemporary Muslim legal discourses on these issues.

Assistant Professor of Law and Middle Eastern Studies Department of Middle Eastern Studies

Professor Barany is the Frank C. Erwin, Jr. Centennial Professor of Government at the University of Texas where he has taught since 1991.  Throughout his career, his research and writing have focused on military politics, military sociology, and democratization globally.  More recently he has become interested in the monarchy as a form of government in the contemporary world.  His early scholarship was also concerned with ethnopolitics (particularly the Gypsies/Roma) and East European politics more generally. 

Professor Barany’s principal current research project is How Armies Respond to Revolutions and Why? (under contract with Princeton University Press).  The central argument of this study is that it is possible to make highly educated guesses, if not outright predictions, regarding the generals’ reaction to revolutions – and thus about the outcome of revolutions – by analyzing a number of domestic and external factors.  The case studies include both single-country revolutions (Cuba, 1959; Iran, 1979) and clusters of revolutions (China and Eastern Europe, 1989; North Africa and the Middle East, 2011) to gauge processes of diffusion.  He is also one of the four principal investigators of a global study on security sector reform and constitutional transition in emerging democracies financed and organized by the Stockholm-based NGO, International IDEA, and the Center for Constitutional Transitions at New York University Law School.

Professor Barany is the author of The Soldier and the Changing State: Building Democratic Armies in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas (Princeton, 2012), Democratic Breakdown and the Decline of the Russian Military (Princeton, 2007), The Future of NATO Expansion (Cambridge, 2003), The East European Gypsies: Regime Change, Marginality, and Ethnopolitics (Cambridge, 2001), and Soldiers and Politics in Eastern Europe, 1945-90 (Macmillan, 1993).  He is the co-editor of five other books: Is Democracy Exportable? (Cambridge, 2009), Ethnic Politics after Communism (Cornell, 2005), Russian Politics (Cambridge, 2001), Dilemmas of Transition (Rowman & Littlefield, 1999), and The Legacies of Communism (Johns Hopkins, 1995).  Professor Barany has published dozens of articles in academic and policy journals including Armed Forces & Societies,Comparative PoliticsEthnic & Racial StudiesGovernment  & Opposition, Journal of DemocracyJournal of Strategic Studies, ParametersPolicy ReviewPolitical Science QuarterlyPresidential Studies QuarterlySecurity StudiesSlavic Review,Strategic Studies Quarterly, and World Politics.

During the final years of the Cold War Professor Barany worked for the U.S. Army in Europe, CBC Radio Canada International in Ottawa, and was a senior researcher at Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty in Munich, West Germany.  He has been a National Fellow and the Susan Louise Dyer Peace Fellow of the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and has held visiting appointments at the University of Oxford, the University of Edinburgh, and at the  East-West Center in Honolulu.  His research has been supported by the Ford Foundation, IREX, NATO, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, as well as several U.S. federal agencies.  Professor Barany is a summa cum laude graduate of Carleton University (1986) and earned his Ph.D. in Foreign Affairs from the University of Virginia (1991) where he was a President's Fellow and a Woodrow Wilson Fellow.  He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations (New York) and the International Institute for Strategic Studies (London).



Frank C. Erwin, Jr. Centennial Professor in Government University of Texas at Austin, Department of Government

One of the nation's leading constitutional theorists, Professor Bobbitt's interests include not only constitutional law but also international security and the history of strategy. He has published ten books: Tragic Choices (with Calabresi) (Norton, 1978), Constitutional Fate (Oxford, 1982), Democracy and Deterrence (Macmillans,1987), U.S. Nuclear Strategy (with Freedman and Treverton) (Macmillans, 1989), Constitutional Interpretation (Blackwells, 1991), The Shield of Achilles: War, Peace and the Course of History (Knopf, 2002), Terror and Consent: The Wars for the Twenty-First Century (Knopf, 2008), The Garments of Court and Palace: Machiavelli and the World That He Made (Atlantic, 2013), The Ages of American Law (with Gilmore, 2d edition) (Yale, 2015), and Impeachment: A Handbook (with Black, new edition) (Yale, 2018).

Bobbitt is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is also a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society. He is a Life Member of the American Law Institute, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Pacific Council on International Policy, the International Institute for Strategic Studies and the Executive Council of the American Society of International Law. He is a member of the Commission on the Continuity of Government. 

He has served as Law Clerk to the Hon. Henry J. Friendly (2 Cir.), Associate Counsel to the President, the Counselor on International Law at the State Department, Legal Counsel to the Senate Iran-Contra Committee, and Director for Intelligence, Senior Director for Critical Infrastructure and Senior Director for Strategic Planning at the National Security Council. He has been a member of the Secretary of State’s Advisory Committee on International Law and was, until January 2017, a member of the External Advisory Board of the CIA.

He is a former trustee of Princeton University; and a former member of the Oxford University Modern History Faculty and the War Studies Department of Kings College, London. For the Fall term 2005, he was the James Barr Ames Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. For the Spring term 2007, he was the Samuel Rubin Visiting Professor of Law at Columbia Law School. For the Fall term 2018, he is Visiting Professor of Law at Yale Law School. Formerly the A.W. Walker Centennial Chair at the Law School, Professor Bobbitt now holds a chair at the Columbia Law School, though he remains a Distinguished Senior Lecturer at the University of Texas.

Distinguished Senior Lecturer University of Texas at Austin, School of Law

Henry William Brands was born in Oregon, went to college in California, sold cutlery across the American West, and earned graduate degrees in mathematics and history in Oregon and Texas. He taught at Vanderbilt University and Texas A&M University before joining the faculty at the University of Texas at Austin, where he holds the Jack S. Blanton Sr. Chair in History. Professor Brands writes on American history and politics and has written twenty-eight books, coauthored or edited seven others, and published dozens of articles and scores of reviews. He lectures frequently on historical and current events, and can be seen and heard on national and international television and radio programs. His articles have appeared in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, the International Herald Tribune, the Boston Globe, the Atlantic Monthly, the Smithsonian, and many other newspapers, magazines and journals. Several of his books have been bestsellers. Traitor to His Class and The First American were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize; The Man Who Saved the Union won the William Henry Seward Award; The Age of Gold was a Washington Post Best Book of 2002 and a San Francisco Chronicle bestseller; Andrew Jackson was a Chicago Tribune Best Book of 2005 and a Washington Post bestseller; and What America Owes the World was a finalist for the Lionel Gelber Prize in international affairs. His writings been translated into Spanish, French, German, Russian, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Ukrainian. Brands is also a member of various honorary societies, including the Society of American Historians and the Philosophical Society of Texas.

Dickson Allen Anderson Centennial Professor of History University of Texas at Austin, Department of History

Sarah Brayne is an Assistant Professor of Sociology and Faculty Research Associate at the Population Research Center at The University of Texas at Austin. In her research, Brayne uses qualitative and quantitative methods to examine the use of big data within the criminal justice system. She is currently writing a book on the use of predictive analytics and new surveillance technologies in the Los Angeles Police Department. In previous research, she studied the relationship between individuals' contact with the criminal justice system and their involvement in medical, financial, labor market and educational institutions. Brayne's research has appeared in the American Sociological Review and has been supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council and the Horowitz Foundation for Social Policy. 

Prior to joining the faulty at UT-Austin, Brayne was a Postdoctoral Researcher at Microsoft Research. She received her Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy from Princeton University. Brayne has volunteer-taught college-credit sociology classes in prisons since 2012. In 2018, she founded the Texas Prison Education Initiative.

Assistant Professor Of Sociology and Faculty Research Associate Population Research Center

Jason Brownlee joined the Department of Government in 2005, after finishing his doctorate in Politics at Princeton University and spending a year as a post-doctoral fellow at Stanford University. A native of North Carolina, Professor Brownlee has been visiting and researching Egypt since 1995, when he studied in Cairo for the first time as an Emory undergraduate abroad. He has published numerous articles and two books addressing Egyptian and international politics. In 2014 he is completing a third, co-authored book, on the Arab uprisings of 2010-2011. Brownlee's research and teaching address questions related to US foreign policy, the Middle East, and comparative political economy.

Professor of Government University of Texas at Austin, Department of Government

Joshua Busby is an Associate Professor of Public Affairs and a fellow in the RGK Center for Philanthropy and Community Service as well as a Distinguished Scholar at the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law. He originally joined the LBJ School faculty in fall 2006 as a Postdoctoral Fellow and Lecturer. Prior to coming to UT, Dr. Busby was a research fellow at the Center for Globalization and Governance at Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School (2005-2006), the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard's JFK School (2004-2005), and the Foreign Policy Studies program at the Brookings Institution (2003-2004). He defended his dissertation with distinction in summer 2004 from Georgetown University, where he also earned his M.A. in 2002.

His first book entitled Moral Movements and Foreign Policy was published by Cambridge University Press in July 2010. In his book, Busby seeks to explain why some countries are willing to take on new international commitments championed by principled advocacy groups and others are not. Substantively, he explores the politics of climate change, developing country debt relief, HIV/AIDS, and the International Criminal Court in selected country cases in the advanced industrialized world. His second book with Ethan Kapstein, AIDS Drugs for All: Social Movements and Market Transformations was also published by Cambridge University Press in September 2013. That book seeks to understand the conditions under which movements can transform markets, with lessons learned from the global AIDS treatment advocacy campaign.

Busby is the author of several studies on climate change, national security, and energy policy from the Council on Foreign Relations, the Brookings Institution, the German Marshall Fund, and the Center for a New American Security (CNAS). Busby is one of the lead researchers in the Strauss Center project on Climate Change and African Political Stability (CCAPS), a $7.6 million grant funded by the U.S. Department of Defense. He has also written on U.S.-China relations on climate change for CNAS and Resources for the Future.

Busby is a Life Member in the Council on Foreign Relations and a member of the International Institute for Strategic Studies. His works have appeared in International Security, International Studies Quarterly, Perspectives on Politics, Security Studies, among other publications. Busby served in the Peace Corps in Ecuador (1997-1999), worked in Nicaragua (Summer 1994, Spring 1996), and consulted for the Inter-American Development Bank (2000). Prior to working with the Peace Corps, he was a Marshall Scholar at the University of East Anglia (Norwich, England), where he completed a second B.A. (with Honors) in Development Studies (1993-1995). He completed his first B.A. (with Highest Distinction) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in Political Science and Biology.

Associate Professor of Public Affairs LBJ School of Public Affairs

Dr. Taylor Canann is a Postdoctoral Fellow with the McCombs School of Business in the Center of Enterprise and Policy Analytics (CEPA), where he studies cyber policy, the economics of information and cybersecurity, and financial technologies. The current focus of Dr. Canann’s research is at the intersection of game theory and cybersecurity. He studies how policies alter the value and uses of cryptocurrencies. He also works on the impacts of vulnerability disclosure policies and Zero-Day exploits on both IoT networks and infrastructure in the United States and Latin America. Dr. Canann graduated from the University of Minnesota with a Ph.D. and an M.A. in economics. He received a B.S. in both economics and mathematics from Brigham Young University.

Postdoctoral Fellow University of Texas at Austin, McCombs School of Business

Professor Chapman studies international organizations, conflict, and cooperation. In 2009-2010 he held a position as a visiting associate research scholar at the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance at Princeton University.  His work on international security organizations, the UN Security Council, political violence, and the International Criminal Court has appeared or is forthcoming in International Organization, the Journal of Politics, the Journal of Conflict Resolution, and International Studies Quarterly. His book, Securing Approval: Domestic Politics and Multilateral Authorization for War, was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2011.  He received his Ph.D. in 2007 from Emory University.

Currently, Dr. Chapman is working on several projects.  The first examines the fiscal origins of military spending and international diplomacy, building on theories of bargaining and war.  The second examines market reactions to IMF program announcements, or the so-called "catalytic" lending effect.

Associate Professor of Government University of Texas at Austin, Department of Government

Dr. Wenhong Chen is associate professor of media studies and sociology at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research has focused on digital media technologies in entrepreneurial and civic settings. Dr. Chen has more than 70 publications, including articles in top-ranked journals in the fields of communication and media studies, sociology, and management. Dr. Chen’s research has received awards from American Sociological Association, the Academy of Management, International Communication Association, and International Association of Chinese Management Research. Dr. Chen was the chair of the Communication, Information Technologies, and Media Sociology Section of American Sociological Association in 2017-2018. Dr. Chen is the lead editor of the book Networked China: Global Dynamics of Digital Media and Civic Engagement (with Stephen Reese, Routledge 2015). Her current project examines policy and entrepreneurial implications of AI, big data and cloud computing.

Associate Professor Moody College of Communication

David Eaton, Ph. D. is the Bess Harris Jones Centennial Professor of Natural Resources Policy Studies at Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs (LBJ School) at The University of Texas at Austin (UT). He was appointed Assistant Professor at the LBJ School in 1976 and promoted to Associate Professor (1980) and Professor (1984-   ). Prior to coming to UT, Eaton worked part-time as a staff member for the U.S. President’s Council on Environmental Quality (1970-73), the Office of the President’s Science Advisor’s energy policy staff (1974-75), the World Bank (1975-6) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (1975-76). Eaton’s research addresses issues relating to environmental management, including water resources, air quality and solid waste, as well as risk and insurance. Eaton has authored or co-authored articles in professional journals, books, reports, and other publications and has won numerous awards from professional associations for his research. The Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appointed Eaton a member of the U.S. President’s Good Neighbor Environmental Board for 2015-2018.

Bess Harris Jones Centennial Professor in Natural Resource Policy Studies LBJ School of Public Affairsj

Ambassador Gregory W. Engle (Ret.) is a Strauss Center Distinguished Scholar and previously served as the Strauss Center's Associate Director.  Prior to that, he served as the Senior Advisor for International Affairs at the International Office of the University of Texas at Austin.  He is currently serving as the Country Director of the Peace Corps's Ethiopia program.

Ambasador Engle previously served as the U.S. Department of State's Diplomat-in-Residence at the LBJ School of Public Affairs, following a thirteen month assignment as Management Counselor of the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad, Iraq.  Before serving in Iraq, he was the U.S. Ambassador to the Togolese Republic.

Ambassador Engle joined the Foreign Service (U.S. Department of State) in 1981, following a tour as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Korea. He has served in management positions in Pakistan, Germany, Washington, Ethiopia, and Cyprus. He was the recipient of the State Department's Leamon R. Hunt Award for Administrative Excellence in 1990.

Following his assignment in Cyprus, Ambassador Engle served as Deputy Chief of Mission at the U.S. Embassy in Lilongwe, Malawi, from 1992 to 1995. Upon leaving Malawi, he was a member of the Foreign Service Institute's 38th Senior Seminar. From 1996 to 1999, he was U.S. Consul General in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Returning to Washington, Ambassador Engle served as Director of International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) from 1999 to 2001, Special Coordinator for the African Crisis Response Initiative from 2001 to 2002, and Director of the Office of Regional and Security Affairs in the State Department's Bureau of African Affairs from 2002 to 2003.

Ambassador Engle received a BA in Political Science and an MPA from the University of Colorado. He is married and has two children.

Ethiopia Country Director The Peace Corps

Rhonda L. Evans is Director of the Edward A. Clark Center for Australia and New Zealand Studies, and Senior Lecturer in the Government Department. She studies Public Law and Comparative Politics, with an emphasis on Western Europe, Australia, and New Zealand.  Her research lies at the intersection of law and politics, paying special attention to issues concerning human rights, discrimination, and asylum seekers. She is conducting new inquires into the policy agendas of political and judicial institutions in Australia and New Zealand as part of the Comparative Agendas Project.

Evans is the co-author of Legislating Equality: The Politics of Antidiscrimination Policy in Europe (Oxford University Press, 2014) and currently has a book on the Australian Human Rights Commission under review.  Her work has appeared in various edited volumes as well as the Journal of Common Market Studies, Australian Journal of Political ScienceCongress and the Presidency, and the Journal of Democracy.

Director, Edward A. Clark Center for Australia and New Zealand Studies & Senior Lecturer Government Department

Dr. Kenneth Flamm is a Professor and the Dean Rusk Chair in International Affairs at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at UT-Austin. He is a 1973 honors graduate of Stanford University and received a Ph.D. in economics from M.I.T. in 1979.

From 1993 to 1995, Dr. Flamm served as Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Economic Security and Special Assistant to the Deputy Secretary of Defense for Dual Use Technology Policy. He was awarded the Distinguished Public Service Medal by the Secretary of Defense for his work at DoD. Prior to, and after his service at the Defense Department, he spent eleven years as a Senior Fellow in the Foreign Policy Studies Program at the Brookings Institution. Dr. Flamm has been a professor of economics at the Instituto Tecnológico A. de México in Mexico City, the University of Massachusetts, and George Washington University.

Over the last decade, Flamm has served as PI for research grants on “Economic Implications of Fair Use,” “Determinants of Internet Use in U.S. Households,” “Internet Use in the Americas,” “Regional Differences in Patterns of Internet Use in the United States,” “Internet Use in Developing and Industrializing Countries,” “Determinants of Broadband Competition,” “Broadband Policy in Comparative International Perspective,” “Changing Modes of Defense Procurement: Implications for Pricing and Innovation in the US Defense Industry,” “Semiconductor Industry Economics,” “Winning the Globalization Game: How Countries Compete in the 21st Century,” ”Modeling Innovation Chains Using Case-Based Econometrics: Nano-electronics and Biotechnology Applications,” “Modeling Pharmaceutical Innovation Pipelines,” and “Digital Inclusion,” and has worked with industry research consortium SEMATECH in building economic models of the semiconductor industry.

Flamm has served as vice-chair of the National Research Council’s Panel on Comparative Innovation Policy, and as a member of its Science, Technology, and Economic Policy Board, its Committee on Assessing the Need for a Defense Stockpile, its assessment panel on the Small Business Innovation Research Program, its Committee on the Rationale and Goals of the U.S. Civil Space Program, its Committee on the Future of Supercomputing, and its Steering Group on Measuring and Sustaining the New Economy. He has served as member and Chair of the NATO Science Committee’s Panel for Science and Technology Policy and Organization, and as a member of the Federal Networking Council Advisory Committee, the OECD’s Expert Working Party on High Performance Computers and Communications, various advisory committees and study groups of the National Science Foundation, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Defense Science Board, and the U.S. Congress’ Office of Technology Assessment, and as a consultant to various government agencies, international organizations, and private corporations.

Dr. Flamm is the author of numerous articles and books on the dynamics of international competition in high technology industries, and studies of the computer, semiconductor, Internet, and telecommunications industries.

 

Professor and the Dean Rusk Chair in International Affairs LBJ School of Public Affairs

Michael G. Findley is an Associate Professor in the Government Department and LBJ School of Public Affairs (courtesy) at the University of Texas at Austin.  His research and teaching address political violence, international political economy, and international development.  He uses field experiments, statistical and computational models and some interviews, and conducts ongoing fieldwork in numerous countries including Uganda, South Africa, Colombia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Nepal, and Malawi.  Findley's publications have appeared in Cambridge University Press, American Journal of Political Science, International Organization, Journal of Politics, International Studies Quarterly, British Journal of Political Science, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Journal of Peace Research, Public Choice, Complexity, Minnesota Law Review, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, and Strategic Management Journal, and World Development, among others.  Findley also works with international organizations some of which include the World Bank, USAID, the African Development Bank, UNICEF, UN Peacebuilding Fund, the International Aid Transparency Initiative, and many aid recipient countries.

Associate Professor University of Texas at Austin, Department of Government

A historian by training, Francis J. Gavin's teaching and research interests focus on U.S. foreign policy, global governance, national security affairs, nuclear strategy and arms control, presidential policymaking, and the history of international monetary relations. Gavin is the inaugural Frank Stanton Chair in Nuclear Security Policy in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Security Studies Program. Prior to joining the faculty of MIT, Gavin was the Director of the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law and the first Tom Slick Professor of International Affairs at Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. He was the Director of the Next Generation Project Texas program at the Strauss Center and was also the Director of "The Next Generation Project - U.S. Global Policy and the Future of International Institutions," a multi-year national initiative sponsored by The American Assembly at Columbia University. He has been an Olin National Security Fellow at Harvard University's Center for International Affairs, an International Security Fellow at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, and a Research Fellow at the Miller Center for Public Affairs at the University of Virginia, where he started "The Presidency and Economic Policy Program."

Gavin received a Ph.D. and M.A. in Diplomatic History from the University of Pennsylvania, a Master of Studies in Modern European History from Oxford, and a B.A. in Political Science (with honors) from the University of Chicago. His publications include numerous scholarly articles, book reviews and editorials. His book, Gold, Dollars, and Power: The Politics of International Monetary Relations, 1958-1971, was published in 2004 by the University of North Carolina Press under their New Cold War History series. His latest book, Nuclear Statecraft, was published in 2012 by Cornell University Press in the series Cornell Studies in Security Affairs, edited by Robert J. Art, Robert Jervis, and Stephen M. Walt.

Gavin has won several prestigious awards and honors, including the 2002-2003 Smith Richardson Junior Faculty fellowship in International Security and Foreign Policy and the 2003-2004 Donald D. Harrington Faculty Fellowship at the University of Texas. In the spring of 2009, he was a senior research fellow at the Nobel Institute in Oslo, Norway, participating in the Institute's project to explore the causes and consequences of nuclear proliferation, "The Spread of Nuclear Weapons: Post Experiences and Future Challenges."

Gavin is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Society of Historians of American Foreign Relations, the International Studies Association, the Council for European Studies, and is an advisor to McKinsey & Company. He serves on the Academic Advisory Board for America Abroad Media in Washington, DC and the Advisory Board for the Center for International Business Education and Research at the University of Texas.

Frank Stanton Chair in Nuclear Security Policy Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Eugene Gholz is an Associate Professor at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at UT-Austin where he works primarily at the intersection of national security and economic policy. From 2010-2012, he served in the Pentagon as Senior Advisor to the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manufacturing and Industrial Base Policy, where he led initiatives to better understand the complex defense supply chain and to apply that understanding in the budget process. He also focused on policy regarding reimbursement of industry's Independent Research and Development (IR&D) expenditures. Before working in the Pentagon, he directed the LBJ School's master's program in global policy studies from 2007-10.

Dr. Gholz previously taught at the University of Kentucky's Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce. He is a research affiliate of MIT's Security Studies Program, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and associate editor of the journal Security Studies. Dr. Gholz works on innovation, defense management, and U.S. foreign policy, and his recent scholarship focuses on energy security. He is the coauthor of two books: Buying Military Transformation: Technological Innovation and the Defense Industry, and U.S. Defense Politics: The Origins of Security Policy. Dr. Gholz received his Ph.D. from MIT in 2000.

Associate Professor of Public Affairs LBJ School of Public Affairs

Kenneth Greene received both his Master's degree and his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. He specializes in political parties and elections in Latin America, with a special emphasis on Mexico. His recent book, Why Dominant Parties Lose: Mexico's Democratization in Comparative Perspective, shows why dominant parties around the globe remained in power for so many decades but why nearly all of them were voted out by century's end. It was awarded the 2008 Best Book Award from the Comparative Democratization Section of the American Political Science Association. More recently, he was co-principal investigator on the Mexico 2006 Voter Panel Study and the Mexico Congressional Candidate Survey, and is completing a project on the rise of the left across Latin America. He has published work on democratization, voting behavior, and social movements in the American Journal of Political Science, Comparative Political Studies, Foreign Affairs en Espanol, Politica y Gobierno, and several book chapters in edited volumes.

Associate Professor University of Texas at Austin, Department of Government

Celeste Ward Gventer was the Associate Director at the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law from 2010 to 2013. She is currently a PhD candidate in the History Department, as well as an inaugural National Security Fellow with the William P. Clements Center for History, Strategy, and Statecraft. Previously, she was Senior Defense Analyst at the RAND Corporation.  Prior to joining RAND, she was the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Stability Operations Capabilities in the Office of the Secretary of Defense from August 2007-January 2009. There she was responsible for providing policy advice on the capabilities needed in the U.S. General Purpose Force to conduct effective stabilization and reconstruction and counterinsurgency operations.

She joined DoD from her second tour in Iraq, where she served for all of 2006 as the political-military advisor to the MNC-I commander, GEN Peter W. Chiarelli. She also served in Iraq from November 2003-June 2004 with the Coalition Provisional Authority, where she assisted in the creation and stand-up of the Iraqi Ministry of Defense and was an assistant to the Iraqi National Security Advisor.

Celeste has also worked as a Special Assistant to the Counselor of the State Department (Dr. Philip Zelikow), as a Strategist in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, as a Research Fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, and as a Defense Analyst at the U.S. Congressional Budget Office.

Celeste received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from Stanford University and a Master of Public Policy degree from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.  She is the recipient of the Global War on Terrorism Civilian Service Medal, the U.S. Army Superior Civilian Service Award, and the Secretary of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service. Celeste is married to a U.S. Army officer (Armor).

National Security Fellow Clements Center for National Security

Paul Hirsch received his Ph.D. in History from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2013. Since then, he has been a Kluge Fellow in Residence at the Library of Congress, and a Postdoctoral Fellow at the UT Institute for Historical Studies. He is the author of "This Is Our Enemy: the Writers' War Board and Representations of Race in Comic Books during World War II," in the August 2014 Pacific Historical Review, which won the AHA's 2015 Jackson Prize for best first publication. Paul has received fellowships from institutions including the National Science Foundation, The Center for the Study of the US and the Cold War at New York University, and the Borchard Foundation for the Study of European History. While a Fellow at the Strauss Center, he is transforming his dissertation into a book for the University of Chicago Press. It explores the complex, global relationship among comic books, U.S. foreign policy, technology, and race during World War II and the first two decades of the Cold War. Paul will also be advancing his current project, a cultural and technological history of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and disability since 1945.

Fellow University of Texas at Austin

Stephanie Holmsten is an Assistant Professor of Instruction in International Relations and Global Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research focuses on the election of women and ethnic minorities around the world, and most recently appeared in Comparative Political Studies. She is also interested in innovative teaching methods, particularly team-based learning, which earned her the Harry Ransom Award for Teaching Excellence. She is currently a Provost Teaching Fellow working with UT’s Global Classroom initiative.

Assistant Professor of Instruction International Relations and Global Studies

Rana Siu Inboden is a Distinguished Scholar with the Robert Strauss Center for International Security and Law and an adjunct professor at The University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Inboden serves as a consultant on human rights, democracy and rule of law projects in Asia for a number of non-governmental organizations. Her current research interests focus on international human rights, Chinese foreign policy, and evaluating the effectiveness of international human rights and democracy projects.

Previously, she served in the U.S. State Department’s Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor. Rana joined the State Department in 2000, serving at the U.S. Consulate in Shanghai, in the Office of Chinese and Mongolian Affairs, and in the Bureau of Intelligence and Research where she covered U.S.-China relations.

She completed her DPhil at Oxford University in the Department of Politics and International Relations. She obtained an M.A. at Stanford University in East Asian Studies and a B.S. at the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. She was awarded a U.S. State Department Superior Honor Award for her work in the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor.

Adjunct Assistant Professor LBJ School of Public Affairs

Dr. Moriba Jah is the Director of the Advanced Sciences and Technology Research in Astronautics (ASTRIA) program, and Associate Professor of Aerospace engineering and Engineering Mechanics in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin, where he trains a new generation of astrodynamicists and space traffic leaders through research and education at the intersection of engineering, policy, and commercialization. He has authored more than 100 scientific articles, columns, and book chapters, including a handful of op-eds. A highly sought public speaker, he has given more than 50 lectures, speeches, and invited talks in the last few years, such as testimony for hearings of U.S. Senate committees, keynotes for business meetings, plenary lectures for scientific conferences, lecture series for NATO’s Science and Technology Organization, TEDx talks, and the Air Force Research Laboratory’s INSPIRE series. Dr. Jah has served as a member of the U.S. delegation to the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UN-COPUOS) and is the chair of the NATO SCI-279-TG activity on defining a Common NATO Space Domain Awareness Operating Picture.

As a professor, Dr. Jah has taught undergraduate and graduate courses at UT Austin related to space and astronautical sciences. Dr. Jah's research focuses on the convergence of policy, technology, and security related to space traffic management and space situational awareness. Government agencies such as the Department of Defense, Air Force Research Laboratory, and others as well as non-governmental organizations and private industry have featured Dr. Jah's research in their own decision-making processes. His expertise, opinions, and research have been published, cited or featured in many media outlets, including the Space News, Wired, ROOM, NatGeo, NPR, BBC, ABC, and others.

Prior to being at UT Austin, Dr. Jah was the Director of the University of Arizona’s Space Object Behavioral Sciences with applications to Space Domain Awareness, Space Protection, Space Traffic Monitoring, and Space Debris research to name a few. Preceding that, Dr. Jah was the lead for the Air Force Research Laboratory’s (AFRL) Advanced Sciences and Technology Research Institute for Astronautics (ASTRIA) and a Principal Investigator for Detect/Track/Id/Characterize Program at AFRL’s Space Vehicles Directorate. He received his B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Prescott, Arizona, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering Sciences from the University of Colorado at Boulder specializing in astrodynamics and statistical orbit determination. Before joining AFRL in 2007, he was a spacecraft navigator for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, CA, serving on Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey, Mars Express (joint mission with ESA), Mars Exploration Rovers, Hayabusa (joint mission with JAXA), and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Dr. Jah founded the American Astronautical Society’s (AAS) Space Surveillance Technical Committee and is the Chair of the AIAA Astrodynamics Technical Committee. He is a member of the Astrodynamics Technical Committee of the International Astronautical Federation (IAF) and a permanent member of the Space Debris Technical Committee of the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA). Dr. Jah is a Fellow of the International Association for the Advancement of Space Safety (IAASS), the AFRL, the AAS and the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS), as well as an AIAA Associate Fellow, IEEE Senior Member, Associate Editor of Elsevier’s Advances in Space Research Journal.

Associate Professor University of Texas at Austin, Department of Aerospace Engineering & Engineering Mechanics

Nathan Jensen (2002, Yale Ph.D.) is a Professor in the Department of Government at the University of Texas-Austin.  He only speaks in the third person for the purposes of website bios.

He was previously an associate professor in the Department of International Business at George Washington University (2014-2016) and associate professor in the Political Science Department at Washington University in St. Louis (2002-2014).

He teaches courses and conducts research on government economic development strategies, firm non-market strategies and business-government relations, the politics of oil and natural resources, political risk in emerging markets, trade policy, and international institutions.

Professor of Government University of Texas at Austin, Department of Government

Derek Jinks is the Marrs McLean Professor in Law at the University of Texas School of Law. He also served as the Charles H. Stockton Professor of International Law at the U.S. Naval War College for 2009-2010. His research and teaching interests include: public international law, international humanitarian law, human rights law, and criminal law. Professor Jinks received a B.A. in anthropology from the University of Texas at Austin, M.A. and M.Phil. degrees in sociology from Yale University, and a J.D. from Yale Law School. Prior to entering law teaching, he clerked for Judge William C. Canby, Jr. of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit; worked in the Prosecutor's Office of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia; served as Senior Legal Advisor and United Nations Representative for the South Asia Human Rights Documentation Centre in India; and served in the delegation of the International Service for Human Rights at the Rome conference for the establishment of a permanent International Criminal Court. Since 2006, he has been a member of the U.S. Secretary of State's Advisory Committee on International Law.

Marrs McLean Professor in Law University of Texas at Austin, School of Law

Alan J. Kuperman is Associate Professor of Public Affairs at the LBJ School of Public Affairs, University of Texas at Austin, where he teaches courses in global policy studies and is coordinator of the Nuclear Proliferation Prevention Project (www.NPPP.org). His research focuses on ethnic conflict, nuclear nonproliferation, and U.S. military intervention. Dr. Kuperman is author of The Limits of Humanitarian Intervention: Genocide in Rwanda (Brookings, 2001), editor of Constitutions and Conflict Management in Africa: Preventing Civil War Through Institutional Design (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014) and Nuclear Terrorism and Global Security: The Challenge of Phasing out Highly Enriched Uranium (Routledge, 2013), and co-editor of Gambling on Humanitarian Intervention: Moral Hazard, Rebellion and Civil War (Routledge, 2006). His articles have appeared in journals and newspapers including Foreign Affairs, International Security, and The New York Times, he has chapters in many edited volumes, and he frequently appears on television and radio.

During 2002-2005, Dr. Kuperman was Resident Assistant Professor and coordinator of the International Relations program at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Bologna, Italy. In 2009-2010, he was a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, in Washington, DC. In 2013-2014, he was a senior fellow at the U.S. Institute of Peace, in Washington, DC. Prior to his academic career, Kuperman worked as Legislative Director for Congressman Charles Schumer, Legislative Assistant for U.S. House Speaker Thomas Foley, Chief of Staff for Congressman James Scheuer, Senior Policy Analyst for the nongovernmental Nuclear Control Institute, and fellow at the U.S. Agency for International Development. He holds an A.B. in Physical Sciences from Harvard University, an M.A. in International Relations and International Economics from SAIS, and a Ph.D. in Political Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Associate Professor of Public Affairs LBJ School of Public Affairs

Mark Atwood Lawrence is an Associate Professor of History and Distinguished Scholar at the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the University of Texas at Austin. During the 2011-2012 academic year, he was the Stanley Kaplan Visiting Professor of American Foreign Relations at Williams College. He received his B.A. from Stanford in 1988, his M.A. from Stanford in 1989, and his doctorate from Yale in 1999. After teaching as a lecturer in history at Yale, he joined the History Department at UT-Austin in 2000. Since then, he has published two books, Assuming the Burden: Europe and the American Commitment to War in Vietnam (University of California Press, 2005) and The Vietnam War: A Concise International History (Oxford University Press, 2008). Lawrence is also co-editor of The First Vietnam War: Colonial Conflict and Cold War Crisis (Harvard University Press, 2007), a collection of essays about the 1946-1954 conflict. He is now at work on a study of U.S. policymaking toward the developing world in the 1960s and early 1970s.

Professor Lawrence teaches a range of graduate and undergraduate courses in the history of U.S. foreign relations, national security policy, the Cold War, and the Vietnam War. In 2005, he was awarded the President's Associates' Award for Teaching Excellence by UT-Austin.

Associate Professor of History University of Texas at Austin, Department of History

Dr. Huaiyin Li is Professor of History and Asian Studies and Director of the Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Texas at Austin.  His research interests include modern Chinese history, contemporary Chinese economy and politics, agrarian studies, and global history.  Professor Li is the author of three books, including Village Governance in North China, 1875-1936 (Stanford University Press, 2005) and Village China Under Socialism and Reform: A Microhistory, 1948-2008 (Stanford University Press, 2009), which won the 2009 Cecil B. Currey Book Award from the Association of Third World Studies, the 2010 Award for Academic Excellence from the Chinese Historians in the United States, and the 2010 Robert W. Hamilton Book Runner-Up Award from University of Texas at Austin.  His most recent book, Reinventing Modern China: Imagination and Authenticity in Chinese Historical Writing (University of Hawaii Press, 2013), received the Robert W. Hamilton Book Runner-Up Award from University of Texas at Austin in 2014.  Professor Li is working on a trilogy about China’s transformation from an empire under the Qing into a nation-state and a global power in the modern era, focusing on a macro-historical analysis of China’s ever-changing geopolitical setting, fiscal-military constitution, and identity building from the seventeenth to the twenty-first centuries.

Professor and Director of the Center for East Asian Studies University of Texas at Austin, Department of History

Vijay Mahajan holds the John P. Harbin Centennial Chair in Business at Mccombs School of Business, University of Texas at Austin. He has received numerous lifetime achievement awards including the American Marketing Association (AMA) Charles Coolidge Parlin Award for visionary leadership in scientific marketing. The AMA also instituted the Vijay Mahajan Award in 2000 for career contributions to marketing strategy. In 2006, he received the Distinguished Alumnus Award from the Indian Institute of Technology (Kanpur) for his contributions to management research. He served as the dean of the Indian School of Business, Hyderabad, from 2002-2004. Professor Mahajan is author or editor of twelve books including his recent 2012 book, The Arab World Unbound. These books have been translated into twelve languages. His book, The 86% Solution, received the Book-of-the-Year award (Berry-AMA) in 2007 and Convergence Marketing and Africa Rising were among the finalists for the same award in 2003 and 2010, respectively. Professor Mahajan is also one of the world's most widely cited researchers in business and economics (as per highlycited.com) and has been invited by more than 120 universities and research institutions worldwide for research presentations. He has also been the editor of the Journal of Marketing Research. Professor Mahajan has consulted with various Fortune 500 companies and has delivered executive development programs worldwide. Mahajan received B.Tech in Chemical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology at Kanpur, his M.S. in Chemical Engineering and Ph.D in Management from the University of Texas at Austin.

John P. Harbin Centennial Chair in Business McCombs School of Business

Professor McDonald is an Associate Professor of Political Science in the Department of Government at the University of Texas at Austin. Professor McDonald teaches courses on international relations theory, international political economy, and international security. His current research focuses on integrating the tools of historical analysis and game theory to rethink systemic theories of international politics. His book, The Invisible Hand of Peace: Capitalism, the War Machine, and International Relations Theory, was published by Cambridge University Press in March 2009. The book was awarded the 2010 Robert Jervis and Paul Schroeder Best Book Prize by the International History and Politics Section of the American Political Science Association and the 2010 Joseph S. Lepgold Prize for best book published on International Relations in 2009. His research has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, International Studies Quarterly, the Journal of Conflict Resolution, The Washington Quarterly, and World Politics. Prior to arriving at UT, Professor McDonald was a postdoctoral fellow at the Christopher H. Browne Center for International Politics at the University of Pennsylvania. Professor McDonald earned his B.A. in political science from the University of Minnesota in 1996, his M.A. in political science from The Ohio State University in 2000, and his Ph.D. in political science from The Ohio State University in 2002.

Associate Professor of Government University of Texas at Austin, Department of Government

Michael W. Mosser is a Lecturer in the Department of Government, International Relations and Global Studies, and at the Center for European Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. He previously served as a visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science at Southwestern University in Georgetown, TX and as the Associate Director of the European Union Center of Excellence. From June 2009 to May 2010, he was the initial military/education liaison for the Strauss Center’s “Climate Change and African Political Stability” grant funded by the US Department of Defense’s Minerva Initiative. From 2006 to 2009 he was an assistant professor at the US Army School of Advanced Military Studies (SAMS) at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, where he taught international relations, security studies, and comparative foreign policy of Western Europe. From 2001 to 2006, he served as Assistant Dean in the Graduate School and Office of International Programs at the University of Kansas. He has published articles in the fields of military art and science and military sociology, and is presently co-authoring a textbook on international organizations. Dr. Mosser earned his PhD in political science in 2002 from the University of Wisconsin – Madison. 

Lecturer University of Texas at Austin, Department of Government

Paula Newberg's work focuses on the intersections between human rights, democratic governance and foreign policy in crisis and transition states, with particular focus on south and central Asia. A scholar and practitioner with wide-ranging experience in multilateral and nongovernmental organizations, Dr. Newberg served as Special Advisor to the United Nations in Asia, Europe and Africa. She was a Senior Associate the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where she co-founded its Democracy Project, and was a Guest Scholar at the Brookings Institution. Prior to coming to UT-Austin, she was the Director of the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy at Georgetown University.

Dr. Newberg has written extensively on constitutional development and jurisprudence in Pakistan, the politics of assistance in and to conflict and post-conflict states, and rights in conditions of insurgency. A former contributing columnist for the Los Angeles Times and The Globe and Mail, she writes for Yale Global Online, and is an advisor to a number of nonprofit organizations working in the rights and democracy fields.

As Fellow of the newly established Wilson Chair at UT Austin, she is creating curricular, training, research and policy programs with institutions in south Asia. At Columbia, Johns Hopkins and Georgetown universities, she taught graduate courses on comparative foreign policy, rights and international affairs, international politics of conflict, and the international politics of south Asia. At UT-Austin, she teaches courses on rights and the state in modern south Asia, and the politics of complex emergencies in south Asia and beyond.

A.B. Oberlin College
Ph.d University of Chicago

Clinical Professor and Fellow of Charles N. Wilson Chair in Pakistan Studies University of Texas at Austin, Department of Government

Ami Pedahzur is the Arnold Chaplik Professor in Israel and Diaspora Studies and a professor at the Department of Government at the University of Texas at Austin. He received his PhD in Political Science from the University in Haifa, Israel where he also taught until 2004. From 2000 to 2004 he served at the University of Haifa as a Senior Fellow and Deputy Head of the National Security Studies Center.

Pedahzur arrived at the University of Texas in 2004 as a Donald D. Harrington fellow and since 2005 has served as a professor at the Department of Government. His main fields of interest are terrorism, counterterrorism, political radicalism, Israeli politics, and security studies. He serves as associate editor of the journal Studies in Conflict and Terrorism. Pedahzur's books include Suicide Terrorism (2005), The Israeli Secret Services and the Struggle Against Terrorism (2009), Jewish Terrorism in Israel (2009, with Arie Perliger) and The Triumph of Israel's Radical Right (2012).

Currently he is working on a new book project which is provisionally entitled Super-Soldiers: The Evolution and Proliferation of Special Forces since the Second World War.

Arnold Chaplik Professor in Israel and Diaspora Studies University of Texas at Austin, Department of Government

 J. Paul Pope retired from the CIA after multiple foreign tours, service as Chief of Station, and assignments as Chief, Deputy Chief, and Chief of Ops in three of the Directorate of Operations’ (DO) largest components. As Chief of the Training and Tradecraft Division, he was responsible for the training enterprise, which included three centers and two separate groups, as well as adapting tradecraft and training to emerging technical challenges and mission imperatives. 

He also served as Assistant Deputy Director of National Intelligence for Partner Engagement, Head of Delegation to NATO’s Civilian Intelligence Committee, and as the Representative of the Director of National Intelligence and Director of CIA to the Commander of the US Pacific Command. He served several foreign tours with the DO and served in Iraq and Afghanistan. Before becoming an operations officer, he was Deputy National Intelligence Officer for the Near East and South Asia on the National Intelligence Council and he led the Insurgency Studies Branch in in the Directorate of Analysis.

Mr. Pope was previously an Army officer, with service on the Army General Staff in the Pentagon after twice commanding at the company level, including command of the only active firebase in the Army on the Korean DMZ. He received his M.A. with Distinction from the Naval Postgraduate School and his B.S. from the United States Military Academy at West Point. He is a Distinguished Graduate of Command and General Staff College, an Honor Graduate of the Field Artillery Advanced Course and a graduate of the National War College’s CAPSTONE course. He retired from the US Army Reserves as a Lieutenant Colonel.

 

Clinical Professor and Senior Fellow in the Intelligence Studies Project LBJ School of Public Affairs

Dr. Jaganath Sankaran works on problems that lie at the intersection of international security and science & technology. Sankaran received his Ph.D. (International Security Policy) in 2012, writing his dissertation on the role of deterrence, dissuasion, denial, and arms control in preserving peace and stability in outer space. Sankaran was trained initially as an engineer and spent the first four years of his career as a defense scientist with the Indian Missile R & D establishment. His work in weapons design and development led to his contemporary interests in matters such as the balance of military power, strategic stability, and arms control. 

The current focus of Sankaran’s research is Asia-Pacific. Sankaran studies the growing military and nuclear weapons capabilities of China and the counter military balancing undertaken by the United States, Japan, India and other states. Sankaran has also worked on U.S.-Russia strategic stability and nuclear arms control.

Sankaran has held fellowships at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University and at RAND Corporation. Sankaran has published in International Security, Contemporary Security Policy, Strategic Studies Quarterly, Arms Control Today, Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, and other outlets. His research has also been published by the RAND Corporation and the Stimson Center.

Assistant Professor LBJ School of Public Affairs

Kenneth I. Shine, MD, is Special Advisor to the Chancellor, University of Texas System. He is currently overseeing the development of a new medical school in South Texas as well as one in Austin. Prior to his role as Special Advisor, Dr. Shine served as Executive Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs. In that capacity he was responsible for the six U. T. System health initiatives and their aggregate operating budget of almost $8.4 billion. He has led system wide initiatives in clinical effectiveness, patient safety, and public health, as well as efforts to transform medical education. He was President of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), from 1992-2002. Under Dr. Shine's leadership, the IOM played an important and visible role in addressing key issues in medicine and healthcare. IOM reports on quality of care and patient safety, heightening national awareness of these issues. Dr. Shine served as President of the American Heart Association in 1985-86.

As founding Director of the RAND Center for Domestic and International Health Security, Dr. Shine led the Center's efforts to make health a central component of U.S. foreign policy and guide the Center's evolving research agenda. Dr. Shine is Professor of Medicine Emeritus at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Medicine. Before becoming president of the IOM, he was Dean and Provost for Medical Sciences at UCLA.

Special Advisor to the Chancellor University of Texas System

Stephen I. Vladeck is a professor of law at the University of Texas School of Law. His teaching and research focus on federal jurisdiction, constitutional law, and national security law. A nationally recognized expert on the role of the federal courts in the war on terrorism, Vladeck’s prolific and widely cited scholarship has appeared in an array of legal publications—including the Harvard Law Review and the Yale Law Journal — and his popular writing has been published in forums ranging from the New York Times to BuzzFeed. Vladeck, who is a co-editor of Aspen Publishers’ leading national security law and counterterrorism law casebooks and a CNN contributor, frequently represents parties or amici in litigation challenging government counterterrorism policies, and has authored reports on related topics for a wide range of organizations—including the First Amendment Center, the Constitution Project, and the ABA’s Standing Committee on Law and National Security.

Professor Vladeck has won numerous awards for his teaching, his scholarship, and his service to the legal profession. He is an elected member of the American Law Institute, a senior editor of the peer-reviewed Journal of National Security Law and Policy, co-editor in-chief of the Just Security blog, a senior contributor to the Lawfare blog, the Supreme Court Fellow at the Constitution Project, and a fellow at the Center on National Security at Fordham University School of Law. He is also a member of the Board of Academic Advisors of the American Constitution Society and the advisory boards of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) and the National Institute of Military Justice (NIMJ).

A 2004 graduate of Yale Law School, Vladeck clerked for the Honorable Marsha S. Berzon on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, and the Honorable Rosemary Barkett on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit. While a law student, he was Executive Editor of the Yale Law Journal and the Student Director of the Balancing Civil Liberties & National Security Post-9/11 Litigation Project, and he was awarded the Potter Stewart Prize for Best Team Performance in Moot Court and the Harlan Fiske Stone Prize for Outstanding Moot Court Oralist. He earned a B.A. summa cum laude with Highest Distinction in History and Mathematics from Amherst College in 2001, where he wrote his senior thesis on "Leipzig's Shadow: The War Crimes Trials of the First World War and Their Implications from Nuremberg to the Present."

Professor of Law UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN, SCHOOL OF LAW

Michael Webber is the Deputy Director of the Energy Institute, Josey Centennial Fellow in Energy Resources, Co-Director of the Clean Energy Incubator at the Austin Technology Incubator, and Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin, where he trains a new generation of energy leaders through research and education at the intersection of engineering, policy, and commercialization. He has authored more than 200 scientific articles, columns, books, and book chapters, including an op-ed in the New York Times and features in Scientific American. A highly sought public speaker, he has given more than 175 lectures, speeches, and invited talks in the last few years, such as testimony for hearings of U.S. Senate committees, keynotes for business meetings, plenary lectures for scientific conferences, invited speeches at the United Nations and the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, and executive briefings at some of the nation's leading companies.

As a professor, Dr. Webber has taught undergraduate and graduate courses at UT Austin since 2007 across departments as diverse as mechanical engineering, chemical engineering, liberal arts, business, geosciences, public affairs, and undergraduate studies. His teaching has been honored three separate times with major awards from the University of Texas System. Dr. Webber's research focuses on the convergence of policy, technology, and resource management related to energy and the environment. Government agencies such as the Department of Energy and non-governmental organizations such as UNESCO have featured Dr. Webber's research in their policy-making decisions. His expertise, opinions, and research have been published, cited or featured in many media outlets, including the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, USA Today, NPR, PBS, The Daily Telegraph, BBC, ABC, CBS, Discovery, Popular Mechanics, New Scientist, MSNBC, and the History Channel,.

Since launching in March 2013, his syndicated television special, Energy at the Movies, has been telecast more than 140 times on more than 90 PBS stations in 26 states and the District of Columbia as of January 2014. The special bridges the gap between academic discourse and popular culture by synthesizing expert analysis of Hollywood films into digestible lessons on the science and history of energy. Energy at the Movies reaches over 43 million households in the United States, with a follow up series in development.

His capstone class "Energy Technology and Policy" was distributed as a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) titled "Energy 101." The course launched in Fall 2013 through a partnership with edX. More than 5000 students signed up for the course during the first three days of its registration period, and within four months 44,000 students from over 170 countries around the world were registered. The global scope of the Energy 101 MOOC fits in with Webber's motto of changing the way the world thinks about energy. Energy 101's completion rate soared above 65% making it one of the most successful 10-week MOOCs of all time. He has also offered the course as part of executive education programs in Austin, Houston, Washington DC, and in Durham, North Carolina.

Dr. Webber received his BA with High Honors in Plan II Liberal Arts and his BS with High Honors in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. He then received both a MS and a PHD in mechanical engineering from Stanford University where he was a National Science Foundation Fellow. He then served as a senior scientist at Pranalytica, where he invented sensors for homeland security, industrial analysis, and environmental monitoring. He holds four patents as a result of his research. He then transitioned to the RAND Corporation studying energy, innovation, manufacturing, and national security. Dr. Webber is one of the originators of Pecan Street Incorporated, a public- private partnership in Austin, Texas, running the nation's largest smart grid experiment.

Webber Energy Group

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Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering Cockrell School of Engineering

Scott Wolford (b. 1979) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Government at University of Texas. Professor Wolford earned his PhD in political science from Emory University in 2008. His research has appeared in the American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Journal of Conflict Resolution, International Studies Quarterly, Journal of Peace Research, and Journal of Theoretical Politics.

Assistant Professor University of Texas at Austin, Department of Government